Category: Manhood in the Bible

Go After Your Weaknesses

To be a Godly man, you must go after your weaknesses and be serious about it. Ask God for help to bury the old man (Romans 6:6). We must be continually, actively casting off corruption and putting on God’s righteousness and true holiness (Ephesians 4:22-24).

 

“Our problems always try to come back, but to be an overcomer God instructs us to destroy that old man so completely that he doesn’t have the will nor the way to come back! If you deal with a problem lightly and return to your business, it will come right back. You will be dealing with the same problems year after year!” He encourages us to fight our problems systematically.

 

Mastering your problems requires contending in battle (2 Timothy 2:3-2:5). Ask God for strength in this fight. He wants you to seek Him for help. In His hand is power and might, and He can provide real strength (1 Chronicles 29:12). If you face your struggles with God, you will emerge a stronger man on the other side.

 

Perhaps you are well aware of some areas you need to change in order to achieve real purity of heart. After all, Satan has marshaled his best efforts to shape society in such a way as to destroy men, and many of his weapons are quite obvious.

 

“What is your greatest enemy? How much do you think about that?” Here is a checklist to start with that’s worth contemplating: “Is it laziness? Or lust? Resistance to government? Discouragement? Do you have to battle selfishness? Or an inferiority complex? How about intellectual vanity? Or all of the above?” Every one of these represents a problem that must be dealt with forcibly. And there are many more such sins and weaknesses, areas that need to change, many of which we cannot even recognize fully without God’s help.

 

The following chapters focus on one sin, not uncommon among a majority of men, and how to overcome it: the sin of pornography. Consider this instruction emblematic of the process of purifying the heart that must take place no matter what the sin may be.

Purify You’re Heart

Within every man lies a human heart: that unknown to mankind is the subconscious and it helps make up one half of your mind, the subconscious is deceitful and desperately wicked (Jeremiah 17:9). It is your responsibility each day to solicit God’s aid in circumcising that heart and daily submit to God so He will create in you a new, clean heart (Psalm 51:10).

 

“Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with ALL thy heart,” Christ says (Matthew 22:37). This is His command. You shall hold nothing back.

 

What is the state of your heart? Where is it divided? Where are there shadows? What are your areas of weakness?

 

A Godly man is the genuine article. He lives with singleness of heart allowing his subconscious = (the heart) and the conscious = (the spirit in man) to commune with each other in unity as one, striving diligently to think with integrity and to live in harmony with how he speaks. Singleness of heart and purity of the spirit in man means mastery of your mind. It is a heart chosen to be uncluttered with the things of the world, uncomplicated by the lusts of the flesh. To achieve such a state takes real diligence and effort, and can only be truly achieved by yielding to God.

 

King David kept that first and great commandment perhaps better than any human except Jesus Christ. His psalms enable us to scrutinize the most intimate details of his relationship with God and to emulate them.

 

“O God, thou art my God, I yearn for thee, body and soul, I thirst, I long for thee, like a land without water, weary, dry. … Thy love is more than life to me …” (Psalm 63:1, 3;). How did David achieve such an unnatural craving, such heartfelt, and Christ-like sincerity in the spirit in man that is his innermost being?

 

Such love is shed abroad in a human heart by the Holy Spirit, which is a gift from God (Romans 5:5). Once receiving that Spirit upon repentance and baptism, we maintain its flow and influence in our lives by (acquiring action through choice) submitting ourselves wholly to God, moment by moment. This requires training your heart. With diligence, vigor, and strength.

 

David trained his heart like a great general trains a soldier, demanding constant exercise to run it in its proper course. That is the only way to train something so unruly as a human heart.

 

Report for Duty

As a Christian father, you must remain alert as long as your children are under your authority. Even after they leave the home, you may still be able to, and should, exert regular positive influence, even with your grandchildren (Deuteronomy 4:9).

 

As for you single’s, you are training for that duty right now by 1. learning to pay attention to others, 2. by learning how to treat women and children with honor, 3. by dating honorably and learning to be attentive to the needs of single ladies, 4. by striving to serve the widows (elders) and the fatherless (elders). These responsibilities also remain after you marry. Remember open your eyes by anointing them.

 

In your conversations, look for needs. Ask about things you can help with or you can find someone else to help with. Find things you can pray about. Pay attention!

 

Here is a specific example of masculine leadership that arises regularly in a family: telling your children what to do. An engaged Christian father regularly issues instructions as he actively directs his children to do things that will benefit them and others. But it only starts there.

 

Once you tell your child to do something, you must then pay attention to the child’s attitude toward that instruction, and then to his or her performance. You cannot simply give an instruction, return to what you were doing and forget what you said. Children, particularly if untrained, will often test the limits of your authority. If you give some direction and then return your full attention to what you were doing before, you are training your child not to be overly concerned about your commands. The child you just told to stop racing his car on the coffee table will go right back to it.

 

Once you give a command, remain on duty. Ensure the child follows through. This must be the case at home, in public, at Church services, everywhere. You simply cannot expect good results if you lose track of what you have instructed your child to do and fail to make sure the lesson sticks.

 

The duties of a man are constant. They require vigilance. They require you to work the works of Him that sent you, while you can. Be urgent. Recognize the onrushing river of opportunities for what it is. Seize each one and let God’s influence come into other people’s lives through you. Express dynamic male leadership. Put Godly manhood into action!

 

God can do so much in your life through your manly role. He can make your home life enriching and wonderful. He can grant you a promotion at work. He can add purpose, spark, and joy to the lives of the people around you. He can cause your girlfriend or wife to blossom emotionally, intellectually, spiritually. He can nourish your children or grandchildren into joyful, wise, and enjoyable young people. He can make you a different man, your family a different family, and your work a different work!

 

But you must anoint your eyes. See where God wants to lead you, what He wants to make of you, and how He wants to bless others through you!

 

See Opportunities And Seize Them

Anoint your eyes, and you will see opportunities to express Godly manhood all around you.

 

Consider Christ’s own example, which defines biblical manhood. Here is His perspective: “I must work the works of him that sent me, while it is day: the night cometh, when no man can work” (John 9:4). Christ’s life was short, limited in duration. He was urgent about taking full advantage of every moment and every interaction.

 

This is the unselfish attitude Godly men must have: a vigilant urgency to take action and to work at serving others. You have to pay attention to other people’s lives, and act on what you see and know.

 

You may look at tomorrow as just another routine day: Snag breakfast, endure the workday, unwind at home, watch a show, go to sleep. But Christ in you looks at tomorrow as a deluge of opportunities: What can I do? Who can I help? How much can I give?

 

Don’t underestimate the potential value of every decision, every encounter, every conversation you have. Recognize opportunities to give for what they are. You’ll probably have one as soon as you finish reading this.

 

To follow Christ’s example and seize that opportunity, you must fight the pull of selfishness and relaxation, and keep your eyes open to opportunities to fulfill your duties as a man!

 

The question is not whether you have a duty to serve others more than yourself. The question is whether you will fulfill your duty. The more you do, the more God-like you will become, and the more habitual this Christ-like attitude will be. The more Christ-like you become, and the more masculine you become.

 

Many of us intellectually understand and agree with the concept of male Christian leadership. But the harder step is to encounter a day-to-day routine occurrence and actively recognize: I need to use this moment right now to express Godly manhood! The same applies to females who want to fully utilize and express Godly womanhood.

 

It is easy to overlook those opportunities. It is also easy to underestimate the effect that YOU, reading these words right now, can have on other people’s lives. 

 

Correcting the matter starts with anointing your eyes. Ask God to show you how to develop into a more dynamic and effective Christian leader.

 

A torrent of opportunities is coming at you. Helping your son with his math homework, approving your daughter’s new dress before she wears it, setting a household rule to unburden your girlfriend or wife, helping your neighbor fix his porch step, knocking out the reports nobody else wants to do at work, holding the door open for the mother of two children at the gas station, skipping the pro football game to visit an elderly member in your congregation, putting your phone away so you’re not distracted when playing with your children, noting something troubling in your teenager’s voice inflection and asking him or her about it, setting rules so dinner time can be quality family time, choosing a topic to lead in conversation after Church services. The deluge of opportunity never ends. And Christ wants to empower you to fulfill those opportunities.

 

But before He can do so, you must be diligent enough to spot them for what they are.

 

Fight the Spirit of this Age

This world constantly encourages self-indulgence: Isn’t it time you take care of yourself? Take a break! You’ve worked hard. You deserve this! It’s in the commercials, it’s in our entertainment, it’s in our diets, it’s in our workplaces, it’s in our schools, it’s in this worlds leaders, and it’s in the air! It is a powerful and influential attitude that Satan broadcasts through the atmosphere around us: self-importance, self-promotion, self-serving, and self-righteousness: selfishness!

 

The Western world is full of the spirit of contributing nothing. Rare are the men who make good things happen. Rare are the men who drive themselves to make a positive difference in the lives of others. We are surrounded by men who, at best, may be wealthy or intellectual, but who are spiritually wretched, miserable, impoverished, blind, and naked!

 

Even we who are striving to be obedient to God all tend to shrink back every now and then, to become complacent, to slip into ruts from time to time. We are tempted by the desire for “me” time, the allure of checking out of our responsibilities for a while.

 

If you are not fighting this spirit of corrupted manhood, you will succumb to it!

 

What counsel does God give the person afflicted by the attitude of rich, luxurious, and spiritually destitute Laodicea? “Anoint thine eyes with eyesalve, that thou mayest see” (Revelation 3:18).

 

We need to open our eyes to the gaping needs that are all around us, needs that have opened up because of the myriad voids of Godly manhood.

 

Those shortcomings must be met by Godly men who see them and charge forward to fill them. Men who see the vision of what God created them to be. Men who recognize their own deficiencies, rely on His Spirit to fill the gap, then act to help others.

 

We need to see where our families need more of our presence and attention. We need to see where our congregations need more Christian manliness.

 

God says in Revelation 3:19 that if He loves us, He rebukes and chastens us. Many men wilt under even gentle correction or promptly begin justifying themselves and deflecting blame onto others. The Godly man embraces correction and zealously repents.

Anoint Your Eyes

Ours is a world of you do your thing, I’ll do mine. It has grown comfortable with accommodating and excusing evils like immorality and perversion that was scarcely imaginable just a few generations ago. Yet people feel smug and self-satisfied, convinced that such tolerance is a virtue.

 

God’s assessment of this age is evident in the personal message Jesus Christ sends to “the church of the Laodiceans” (Revelation 3:14-3:22). This is the end times and the final era of God’s Church, which exists right before Christ’s Second Coming. This is a time when truth has been cast to the ground (Daniel 8:12). Laodiceanism is the spirit of the age, it’s a spiritual disease that permeates not only the majority of God’s people (all those who profess to be his), but also society as a whole.

 

I know thy works, that thou art neither cold nor hot,” Christ says. “I would thou wert cold or hot. So then because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spue thee out of my mouth. Because thou sayest, I am rich, and increased with goods, and have need of nothing; and knowest not that thou art wretched, and miserable, and poor, and blind, and naked” (Revelation 3:15-3:17).

 

This spiritual wretchedness, accompanied by complacency and self-righteousness, deeply affects modern manhood. Many men are weak, effeminate, indeterminate, numbed by materialistic luxury and idleness, blanketed in a spirit of lukewarmness.

 

God wants men to be strong, masculine, and on fire for the truth! God needs men who are burning with zeal. His Work needs men who are ardently devoted to God’s purpose. Children need fathers and wives need husbands who are keenly engaged in their daily lives, leading the way God ordained.

 

Be honest: To what degree have you allowed yourself to get weighed down by Satan’s world? To take comfort in complacency, to shrink back into unmanliness? To feed your own laziness, selfishness, smallness? Is the trajectory of your life really leading you to where God wants you to be? 

Lif

Jesus Christ is Exemplar of Masculinity

Artists and theologians have portrayed Christ as a skinny, soft-spoken, long-haired, effeminate wimp who died of a broken heart. This is not who He was. The Bible says it is shameful for a man to have long hair and that effeminate men won’t even be in God’s Kingdom (1 Corinthians 11:14; 6:9).

 

Jesus was a real man.

 

The real Jesus was nothing like what most people imagine! The Bible says Jesus was a muscular man of perfect health and enduring strength. He kept all the physical laws of good health (Hebrews 4:15). Before His ministry began at age 30, He worked with stone and timber as a carpenter (Mark 6:3). He had well-developed, hardened muscles and tanned skin from laboring outdoors throughout His life. During His ministry, He walked from city to city through mountainous terrain, sometimes traveling many miles in one day.

 

Artists who paint Jesus as effeminate must not have read John 2, where Christ confronted money changers in the temple. When He saw shady business transacting inside God’s house, He took a handful of ropes and whipped the livestock to drive them out. He kicked over tables and chairs and threw money all over the floor. His deep voice bellowed through the halls: “Get out of God’s house, and take your things with you!” This was at the beginning of His ministry, when few even knew who this man was (John 2:18). Yet these Jews were too fearful to challenge this strapping, righteously indignant young man.

 

Before being tempted of the devil, Jesus went without food and water for 40 days; something no frail weakling could ever endure. Before His crucifixion, Jesus was brutally beaten (John 19:1), then nailed to a stake with iron spikes. Yet his health was so robust that He lived through what would have easily killed the average man. He survived until a Roman soldier finally thrust a spear into His side.

 

Physical fitness is only a fraction of Godly masculinity, though. Jesus was a learned man who took His education seriously even as a child of his youth. Though little is recorded about His younger years, there is enough for us to know that, as a boy, Jesus obeyed His parents, Joseph and Mary, and developed an intimate relationship with His Spiritual Father in heaven (Luke 2:51-2:52).

 

At 12 years old, He entered the temple at Jerusalem and discussed the truth of God with the most educated theologians. Luke 2:47 says those who heard Him were “astonished at his understanding and answers.” They were amazed by how much He understood and He was 12! As Jesus grew up, He “increased in wisdom and stature, and in favour with God and man” (verse 52).

 

The mere fact that Christ began His ministry at the relatively young age of 30 reveals what kind of character He had as a boy, a teenager, and a young adult. By the time His ministry began, Jesus had developed into a powerful, persuasive speaker. Those who heard Him were astounded, and those who hadn’t heard Him traveled a long way so they could. People who knew Him as a child couldn’t believe how eloquently this Jewish carpenter could speak. When He finished speaking, He often tried to withdraw for a quiet moment, yet throngs of people would sometimes track Him down (Luke 4:42).

 

Jesus also had a commanding presence. His doctrine astonished the masses, because He “taught them as one having authority” (Matthew 7:29). He boldly castigated the self-righteous religious leaders of the day: “Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites!” He cried. “Ye serpents, ye generation of vipers, how can ye escape the damnation of hell?” (Matthew 23:29, 33). Yet Jewish authorities coveted His popularity. Even Pontius Pilate, who oversaw Christ’s execution, acknowledged that Jesus was a just man who spoke the truth (Matthew 27:24).

 

Together with steel-like traits of vibrant health, intelligence, decisive leadership, righteous indignation, and powerful persuasiveness, Jesus also exhibited many velvet qualities. Above all, He was humble. Publicans and Pharisees criticized Him for spending time with sinners, but He knew that the sick are the ones who need the physician (Luke 5:31-32). The Lord and Master of the disciples instituted an ordinance of humility at His final Passover, and He washed their feet (John 13:13-14). Though He was their Lord and Master, that merely meant He served them all the more. He taught that those who serve most will receive the highest positions in God’s Kingdom. You can see why Jesus, the most humble servant ever, qualified to be King in God’s Kingdom.

 

Jesus was also a compassionate man. No matter how busy He was or how crowded the scene, He made time for the disadvantaged. Christ once left Jericho with a great multitude, and two blind men cried out to Him for mercy. The multitude rebuked them, but Jesus stopped to help. “So Jesus had compassion on them, and touched their eyes: and immediately their eyes received sight, and they followed him” (Matthew 20:34).

 

This genuine compassion for others even caused Christ to weep on occasion. In the case of Lazarus, Jesus cried because of the people’s lack of faith (John 11:32-43).

 

The gentleness of Jesus is reflected in how He treated children. In Mark 10, after some adults pressed to have Him lay hands on their little ones, His own disciples rebuked the parents. But He reprimanded the disciples, saying we must all become as little children to enter God’s Kingdom. He then took these children up in His arms and blessed them.

 

This same kindness drew many women to Christ. Some even wept at His feet. At Jacob’s well, Jesus asked a Samaritan woman for water. She was taken aback, since other Jews wouldn’t even speak to Samaritans. Christ discerned that this woman was involved in an adulterous relationship; the way He dealt with her evidently prompted her to repent of that wickedness and to support Christ’s work (John 4:28-30).

 

This is how quickly Jesus forgave people who showed fruits of repentance. Another time, scribes and Pharisees were about to stone a woman caught in the act of adultery. But Jesus intervened to prick everyone’s conscience: “He that is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone at her” (John 8:7). After everyone left, He told the woman to go and sin no more.

 

Jesus Christ was the epitome of true masculinity. He wasn’t all steel, lording His authority over people. Neither was He all velvet. weak and effeminate standing for nothing. He possessed the perfect balance of virtues both powerful and tender, uncompromising and compassionate, blameless and merciful. He was both steel and velvet: strong, bold, courageous, gentle, patient and meek. This Godly form of masculinity drew many men, women, and children to Him.

 

The Bible paints the portrait of a real man; the kind of man all men should strive to become.